Left arm connection critical for golf swing

You must keep your arms and body connected so they move in a synchronised unit.

If your arms separate from the body, you are totally dependent and hand/eye co-ordination and timing and that is inconsistent from one day to the next.

If you keep your arms and body connected, there are less moving parts so your swing becomes more repeatable. Your also using the bigger muscles in your body so you get more power with less effort.

‘Maintaining this connection, almost magically, synchs up your body turn with your arm swing while keeping you on-plane with your clubface square during your backswing. Maintaining this connection on the way down keeps you on-plane with the clubface square and lets you synch up your body turn with your arm swing to help you produce your maximum power through impact.’

Golf Tips: Stay Connected

The best swing thought is that your left arm is ‘glued’ to your chest in the left arm pit area. A well known training drill is to put a glove, tee or towel in your left armpit to practice it. You’ll see some pros putting it in the right armpit too, and some even do drills with a towel in each arm pit. Personally, I find that if I focus on connection in both armpits it makes me too rigid and doesn’t work.

I’ve found that focusing on my left side to stop my right side dominating the swing has been a good strategy for me and this left armpit approach obviously achieves that whilst at the same time tightening up my swing. Played 10 holes today and my iron play was much better.

‘Left side connection was invented by Sam Byrd and later popularized by Jimmy Ballard. Byrd was a sensational golfer (25 tour wins) who also played pro baseball at one time. He was known as ‘Babe Ruth’s legs’ as he often would serve as a pinch runner for Ruth. during his time spent with Ruth, he began to learn Ruth’s trick for hitting the ball with power by putting a handkerchief under his lead arm.’

3Jack Golf Blog – Left Side Connection

The Key Move – Mindful Golfer

Jimmy Ballard even use to talk about a ‘shorter left arm’ or ‘half a left arm’ meaning that the upper part of the left arm was attached to the body. I now realise that most of my swing problems have been attributable to the fact that I was getting far too armsy and disconnected, getting out of sync and hitting fat/ thin shots etc.

The annoying thing is I’ve been aware of this before but like most swing fixes I didn’t stick with it long enough to really see the benefits. I’m definitely not going to forget about it’s importance again.

 

Shortening your golf swing

I was focusing mainly on my wedges today at the range, dialling in my distance control using an imaginary clock-face as my reference. It was going well, and got me thinking that I should be doing the same thing with my full swing, as I’m sure I have a tendency to get very long and sloppy resulting in poor shots.

So I tried it with a few irons (5, 6, 7) and the results were promising – certainly no loss of distance and it felt a lot more controlled and compact with a better transition. Need to practice it more but focusing on the left arm going no further back than 9pm (parallel) seems to help (it probably goes a bit further in reality, 10 or 10.30pm, with momentum in a full swing but still prevents overswing and gets everything starting back down at the same time.

Shorter backswing works!

Almost every golfer has a backswing that is too long…

Shortened backswing

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